happiness is gingerbread lips

Last Saturday, I baked.  For 4 hours.  I prepped gingerbread cookies and rolled them out to refrigerate.  Beware when adding baking soda, your molasses will inflate 10-fold.  Then I got some pumpkin cream sandwiches going — my favorite holiday cookie indulgence.  Baked the pumpkin cookies and set out to cool while whipping together the cream cheese mixture and cutting the chilled gingerbread into fun shapes.  Upon a cookie cutter scouting trip through our cupboards, I found one Christmas tree, two fish, and a box of Valentine-themed shapes (because who wouldn’t want to bite into a pair of cookie lips?).

The original purpose of my baking extravaganza (yes, I consider two types of cookies an extravaganza — I’m not usually the baker in my house) was to feed my art-and-crafting lady friends for my third art party gathering.  Most of our time is used knitting adorable baby hats and scarves.  (‘Tis the age of birthing: I personally know at least 15 girls who have either gotten pregnant or had a baby in the last year.  In fact, one of the party attendees gave birth just last week, and another is due in January!)

Once I got into my baking, I surprised myself by how much I was enjoying it.  I was… happy.  And it caught me off-guard.  Not that I’ve necessarily led an unhappy existence.  I just tend to feel guilty when happiness begins to rise within me.  I attribute this to a solid beating of Romans and Corinthians, twisted and taught to me over the years as a desire for hardship over success.  I remember being told countless times that my life wouldn’t be difficult if the devil didn’t think I was a “threat” to his schemes.  So, if life wasn’t difficult, my peers and I wondered if we were too “lukewarm” to be bothered with.  Saying this aloud to my new* therapist makes me feel more than a little psychotic.  But perhaps not as psychotic as the people who encouraged me to feel this way.

All to say, I’ve been happier.  And I can admit it.  Hopefully there’s more where that came from.

* When my old therapist told me that I need to believe in Satan before I can experience any recovery, I decided it was time to move on.

3 thoughts on “happiness is gingerbread lips

  1. If “happiness is gingerbread lips” then we might be in need of more happiness, ’cause I think I ate the last one. It’s been wonderful to see you find things that make you happy.

    I was going to comment about the misuse of that “lukewarm” passage, but I thought, “Why ruin a happy moment by dwelling on abusive theology?” So I wont.

    I’m glad you can admit that you did something that made you happy. I’m certain there is more of that down the road for you.

    1. I would be happy for you to comment on the misuse of the passage. Hearing that I’m not crazy for questioning what I was taught is always a good thing.

  2. Well, most of the time I’ve heard that verse used, it has used like this:
    God doesn’t want “lukewarm” Christian who just go to church and call themselves a “Christian,” but don’t live like they are a Christian. God wants you to be “on fire.” God want people to respond to him, either for him or against him (“hot or cold”), but does not want people to be apathetic (“lukewarm”).

    Does this sound familiar at all? The part that makes no sense to me is the part where Christian leaders are saying that God would rather people NOT be in a relationship with God than be “lukewarm.” Wouldn’t God desire everyone to be in a relationship with him? So, why would God praise the people who are “cold” but reject the “lukewarm?” I was never given a very good answer to why this passage was taught this way. I guess the usage of “lukewarm” is such a good buzzword, that people would rather misuse the verse to use the buzzword.

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happiness is gingerbread lips

Last Saturday, I baked.  For 4 hours.  I prepped gingerbread cookies and rolled them out to refrigerate.  Beware when adding baking soda, your molasses will inflate 10-fold.  Then I got some pumpkin cream sandwiches going — my favorite holiday cookie indulgence.  Baked the pumpkin cookies and set out to cool while whipping together the cream cheese mixture and cutting the chilled gingerbread into fun shapes.  Upon a cookie cutter scouting trip through our cupboards, I found one Christmas tree, two fish, and a box of Valentine-themed shapes (because who wouldn’t want to bite into a pair of cookie lips?).

The original purpose of my baking extravaganza (yes, I consider two types of cookies an extravaganza — I’m not usually the baker in my house) was to feed my art-and-crafting lady friends for my third art party gathering.  Most of our time is used knitting adorable baby hats and scarves.  (‘Tis the age of birthing: I personally know at least 15 girls who have either gotten pregnant or had a baby in the last year.  In fact, one of the party attendees gave birth just last week, and another is due in January!)

Once I got into my baking, I surprised myself by how much I was enjoying it.  I was… happy.  And it caught me off-guard.  Not that I’ve necessarily led an unhappy existence.  I just tend to feel guilty when happiness begins to rise within me.  I attribute this to a solid beating of Romans and Corinthians, twisted and taught to me over the years as a desire for hardship over success.  I remember being told countless times that my life wouldn’t be difficult if the devil didn’t think I was a “threat” to his schemes.  So, if life wasn’t difficult, my peers and I wondered if we were too “lukewarm” to be bothered with.  Saying this aloud to my new* therapist makes me feel more than a little psychotic.  But perhaps not as psychotic as the people who encouraged me to feel this way.

All to say, I’ve been happier.  And I can admit it.  Hopefully there’s more where that came from.

* When my old therapist told me that I need to believe in Satan before I can experience any recovery, I decided it was time to move on.

3 thoughts on “happiness is gingerbread lips

  1. If “happiness is gingerbread lips” then we might be in need of more happiness, ’cause I think I ate the last one. It’s been wonderful to see you find things that make you happy.

    I was going to comment about the misuse of that “lukewarm” passage, but I thought, “Why ruin a happy moment by dwelling on abusive theology?” So I wont.

    I’m glad you can admit that you did something that made you happy. I’m certain there is more of that down the road for you.

    1. I would be happy for you to comment on the misuse of the passage. Hearing that I’m not crazy for questioning what I was taught is always a good thing.

  2. Well, most of the time I’ve heard that verse used, it has used like this:
    God doesn’t want “lukewarm” Christian who just go to church and call themselves a “Christian,” but don’t live like they are a Christian. God wants you to be “on fire.” God want people to respond to him, either for him or against him (“hot or cold”), but does not want people to be apathetic (“lukewarm”).

    Does this sound familiar at all? The part that makes no sense to me is the part where Christian leaders are saying that God would rather people NOT be in a relationship with God than be “lukewarm.” Wouldn’t God desire everyone to be in a relationship with him? So, why would God praise the people who are “cold” but reject the “lukewarm?” I was never given a very good answer to why this passage was taught this way. I guess the usage of “lukewarm” is such a good buzzword, that people would rather misuse the verse to use the buzzword.

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